The Unspoken World of Email Etiquette

Rules and regulations have always governed our lives. Whether we are talking about the way we live in society or the way we talk to the people we know, we are always looking at rules and regulations to ensure that everything is right. Emails are another such entity, that we encounter in our daily lives, which is governed by an unparalleled world of rules and regulations. Most of them are unsaid while some are made as you go along.

Here are some of those rules that no one tells you about, but are just expected to know.

BCC

The worst thing you can do is tell everyone you know about everyone else you know. Weird things are bound to happen when you copy all your friend’s email IDs into the “To” or the “CC” columns of your email. The next thing you know, people pick out the email IDs of the people they think they would like to contact, for whatever reason, but weren’t able to, for a very good reason.

Everyone deserves a Reply

How many times have you seen someone miss out on a conversation or discussion, they were originally a part of, because someone decided to click on “Reply” instead of “Reply All”. Fact is, if someone was copied onto the recipient’s boxes, there must have been a reason behind it. Maybe they wanted to be in the loop or maybe they needed to be in the loop. However, Mr. Quick Fingers decides to send it back to the only person who sent the email and ignores everybody else, telling them that they are not needed in the conversation, despite of what anyone else might believe.

War and Peace

The worst thing you can do in an email is go into the greatest detail when talking about the subject at hand. Human attention span is quite low and when you put things down in yards and yards of text, they are unlikely to read anything in it. There is nothing that puts someone off more than a long email that takes away precious moments of their life. Keep things in bullets and try to be as short and sharp as possible – you might just find people listening to you for a change.

Check for Diseases

You wouldn’t want to walk into a room where someone has a cold and leave it with a bit of their infection with you. The email is something similar. If you have a virus, because of surfing through dubious websites, there is no need to make someone else suffer the consequences with you. Get yourself an anti-virus because spamming or sending viruses to others, through email, is just not cool.

Overload

Most mailboxes come with a size limit and since you aren’t the only person in the world who sends out emails to others, you need to be considerate of their mailboxes and its capacity. Sending someone a 10MB file might seem cool because the job is getting done, but what you are doing, effectively, is blocking their mailbox until that 10MB message hasn’t downloaded onto their computer. And then, there’s always the thing about filled up mailbox space. If you send out too large an email, you might just end up leaving no room for them to get anything else.

Email etiquettes are quite important because they are as close to having a conversation with someone as the computer would allow. Unlike chat, which is more spontaneous, emails give you the opportunity to carefully construct your sentences, think your thoughts through and make sure that everything is in order. If you still manage to miss out on some of  the things spoken about, above, then you are likely to be considered as a rude and obnoxious person on the market.

Brenda Orville – author

Brenda has been something of a masterpiece when it comes to the ideal employee for any company. Starting as an office assistant in the lowest rungs of an IT company, Brenda was part of an IT Helpdesk near Kingston in Surrey, and was responsible for handling internal and external communications of the company. Working for over 20-years, with the same company, Brenda rose from a trainee to her current position as head of the administrative department, where her focus on detail & the company’s brand have given her an edge over the others that have worked with her.